President Mnangagwa has hailed the philanthropic work by First Lady Auxillia Mnangagwa through her Angel of Hope Foundation.

The President said this during yesterday’s 41st Independence Day celebrations held at State House.

Through her foundation, the First Lady has spearheaded various projects across the country that have benefited vulnerable and marginalised communities.

“I would like to commend the First Lady, Amai Mnangagwa and the Angel of Hope Foundation for implementing various humanitarian programmes and projects across the country, towards nurturing respect, discipline and greater appreciation of our culture and heritage, among the youth,” said President Mnangagwa. 

“Her work with regards to tourism and health advocacy is equally appreciated.” 

The First Lady, who is the country’s health ambassador, has led in initiatives that improve access to treatment for people with HIV and early detection and treatment for cervical cancer.

She has initiated various empowerment projects for marginalised communities like the San and the Doma communities in Matabeleland South and Mashonaland Central provinces respectively.

Being the founder and patron of the Angel of Hope Foundation, the First Lady is championing the provision of basic amenities to vulnerable groups in Zimbabwe.

In 2017, when she became the First Lady, her marvellous works intensified through the Angel of Hope Foundation which houses her initiatives of empowering the vulnerable.

In respect of her tireless efforts, the First Lady, through her foundation, has managed to visit countless communities and institutions donating foodstuffs, bed linen, stationery, ICT and medical equipment, and initiating comprehensive self-help projects like fish ponds, nutrition gardens, orchards and free-range chicken rearing.

The First Lady continues to be involved with people’s livelihoods and has been an active member of the Organisation of African Ladies against HIV/AIDS, the organisation renowned for actively equipping youths with knowledge on sexual health matters and discourages premarital sex.

She has been impartial in terms of empowering women and her list includes chiefs’ wives and those from diverse backgrounds.

Marginalised communities continued to be facilitated with medical specialist services, such as the provision of accessible and free cervical, breast and prostate cancer screening through the First Lady’s free mobile clinic screening programme.

The First Lady also launched the National Human Papillomavirus Vaccination (HPV), an anti-cancer programme expected to benefit over 800 000 girls aged between 10 and 14.

In fact, the First Lady has been to remote places like Kanyemba where she changed the lives of previously marginalised Doma people in the Zambezi Valley through engaging in income-generating projects and building of conventional houses.

She has been commended by the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education and other stakeholders for her keen interest in addressing and engaging adolescents by way of interactive sessions on a country wide schools programme discussing issues around child abuse, early marriages, teen pregnancies, drug abuse, bullying and school drop-outs.

This year, the First Lady through her Angel of Hope Foundation delivered desks, chairs, uniforms and stationery for 130 pupils at MayPark Primary School in Mashonaland Central Province.

She also donated specialised beds to hospitals in Bulawayo, Midlands, Masvingo, Mashonaland East and Mashonaland Central provinces.

Inmates at various prisons received an assortment of foodstuffs and toiletries which eased their plight in the wake of the ravaging Covid-19 pandemic.

The First Lady complemented Government efforts by donating tonnes of maize meal and rice, packs of washing soap and boxes of cooking oil at Ruwa Rehabilitation Centre.

She has been to several rural areas where young girls and boys were taught the traditional roles and urged to impart the knowledge to others.

Before becoming First Lady, she was very influential towards the establishment of women’s banks in Silobela, Zhombe, Kwekwe, Chirumanzu-Zibagwe, Mvuma and other areas in the Midlands.

She managed to kick-start women empowerment through ownership of livestock and handicrafts such as sewing, knitting and clay pot moulding.

As a promoter of good hygiene, many rural homes were improved in the Midlands during her tenure as a parliamentarian, giving them a new breath of life.

She was also the one behind encouragement and promotion of women to take part in cross border trading as a means of self-sustenance.

SOURCE: The Herald

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